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Showing posts from December 30, 2017

Four covering letter blunders (and how to avoid them)

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Four covering letter blunders (and how to avoid them) Find out about the phrases you should avoid including in your covering letter for an internship, work experience placement or graduate job, and why. Graduate cover letters and application form answers take ages to craft well, so don't waste all that effort by including a clich├ęd statement that, however well-intentioned, might undo all your good work elsewhere. Here are some sentiments and phrases that you should avoid when writing covering letters for work experience placements or graduate jobs… Don't say: I just can't convey on paper how excited I am about this opportunity What you probably think you’re saying:  I'm very excited about the vacancy and I hope I get it. What the recruiter thinks:  You can't communicate. What you should say instead:  Articulate your reasons for applying for the vacancy (and make it specific to the job at that company, not just wantin
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Making speculative applications for graduate jobs Not all graduate vacancies are advertised, so sometimes the only way in is to apply 'on spec'. Read on for tips on how to use speculative job applications to uncover the hidden jobs market. Many jobs aren't advertised, particularly in the media, charity work, design and environmental work. One of the only ways to tap into this hidden graduate job market is to write a speculative application. Many jobs aren’t advertised, particularly in the media, charity work, design and environmental work. One of the only ways to tap into this hidden graduate job market is to write a speculative application. This can also be a useful way to approach small employers who don’t recruit graduates onto a formal scheme or to find jobs in a highly specialised field or specific location. Just like applying for advertised vacancies, this needs a targeted approach to be productive. The next six po

Writing tips for graduates: how to communicate with recruiters

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Writing tips for graduates: how to communicate with recruiters Your first communication with a graduate recruiter is likely to be an email, application form or CV and covering letter. Use my professional writing tips to make the best first impression. Employers look for clear, accurate communication in all forms of written correspondence: emails, letters, CVs, applications. Employers use applications, covering letters and CVs as a first-stage assessment of your written communication skills, which are usually seen as essential for graduate jobs. You may not craft long reports or strategy documents, but emails are a fact of working life in most careers and even for the shortest note, clear communication is essential. Employers may also evaluate your skills through any other form of written correspondence you send to them.  An offhand enquiry email could put you out of the running for a job. Employers look for clear, accurate communic

Writing CVs for different types of graduate job

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Whether your target is a graduate scheme with consultancy firm  or a vacancy for a graduate managing a hardware, write a CV that is right for the job. Many graduate recruiters hate CVs that are wacky or pompous. Before you rush to download template CVs, here's a big warning:  recruiters hate spam CVs  – so you'll need to  adapt your job application  according to your skills, the employer, the market in which it sits and the role on offer. First of all: 1) Read below for the basic differences between types of CV for graduates. 2) Get more specific information particularly about job applications within particular graduate career sectors. 3) Use this site to research employers – go to the  employer hubs  for tips on applications and interviews with leading graduate employers. 4) And then  download your sample CV  and adapt it using our tips below. Style 1: the traditional CV – sells your track record Most CVs used by students and gradua